STUDY DESIGN:
Prospective multicenter observational study of the outcome of surgery for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis.

OBJECTIVES:
To identify correlates of patient satisfaction with the results of surgery.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:
Little published information exists on correlates of patient satisfaction after surgery for spinal stenosis.

METHODS:
Preoperative and 6-month follow-up data for 194 patients were analyzed. Associations between preoperative variables and satisfaction with the results of surgery were examined in univariate and multivariate models.

RESULTS:
In multiple linear regression models that adjusted for the effects of age, gender, individual surgeon, number of interspaces decompressed, whether a fusion was performed, depression score, and overall level of pain, the predominance of back (as opposed to leg) pain, greater comorbidity, and worse preoperative functional status were associated with lower patient satisfaction. The regression model explained just 15% of the variance in patient satisfaction.

CONCLUSIONS:
Patients bothered predominantly by back pain preoperatively and those with greater medical comorbidity and functional disability are significantly less satisfied with the results of surgery for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis.





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