Eccentric-contraction-induced skeletal muscle injuries, included in what is clinically referred to as muscle strains, are among the most common injuries treated in the sports medicine setting. Although patients with mild injuries often fully recover to their preinjury levels, patients who suffer moderate or severe injuries can have a persistent weakness and loss of function that is refractory to rehabilitation exercises and currently available therapeutic interventions. The objectives of this review were to describe the fundamental biophysics of force transmission in muscle and the mechanism of muscle-strain injuries, as well as the cellular and molecular processes that underlie the repair and regeneration of injured muscle tissue. The review also summarizes how commonly used therapeutic modalities affect muscle regeneration and opportunities to further improve our treatment of skeletal muscle strain injuries.





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