Spinal stenosis is common and presents in a variety of forms. Symptomatic lumbar stenosis occurs in approximately 10% of the population and cervical stenosis in 9% over age 70. Imaging is central to the management decision process and first-choice MR imaging may be substituted with CT and CT myelography. A review of the literature is presented with particular emphasis on the clinical-radiologic correlation in both neurogenic intermittent claudication and cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Advanced techniques promise improvements, particularly with radicular compressive lesions, but remain underutilized in routine clinical practice.





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