BACKGROUND:
Human parathyroid hormone (PTH) (1-34) or teriparatide (TPTD) is an anabolic agent for osteoporosis. This recombinant protein stimulates positive bone formation balance and bone remodeling. However, when concomitantly used with antiresorptive (AR) agents, previous studies reported conflicting results in their potential additive and synergistic effects on bone metabolism and bone mineral density (BMD). This study aimed to integrate previous evidence to assess the effect of TPTD monotherapy and the additive effect of TPTD on AR agents in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:
This meta-analysis identified 9 RCTs from databases. To assess the therapeutic effect on osteoporosis, the weighted mean differences (WMDs) were used to pool the percentage change of BMD along with the 95% confidence intervals (CIs). BMD of 3 skeletal sites, including lumbar spine, total hip, and femoral neck were assessed.

RESULTS:
TPTD alone could significantly improve BMD of all 3 skeletal sites compared with placebo, although the effect on the femoral neck was less conclusive. The additive effect of TPTD over hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and denosumab (DEN) agents is evident in all 3 skeletal sites. But TPTD plus Alendronate (ALN) did not demonstrate additive effect in total hip and femoral neck.

CONCLUSIONS:
TPTD alone could significantly improve BMD of lumbar spine, total hip, and femoral neck. BMD outcomes of concomitant use of TPTD and AR agents are site-dependent and vary depending on the specific AR agent used and the timing of AR therapy initiation.





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