Metastatic bone disease is a major contributor to the deterioration of the quality of life of patients with cancer; it causes pain, impending and actual pathological fractures, and loss of function and may also be associated with considerable metabolic alterations. Operative treatment may be required for an impending or existing fracture and intractable pain. The goals of surgery are to provide local tumor control and allow immediate weight-bearing and function. Radiation therapy is often indicated postoperatively. Detailed preoperative evaluation is required to assess the local extent of bone destruction and soft-tissue involvement, involvement of other skeletal sites, and the overall medical and oncological status.



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