At a mean 15-year follow-up, the authors evaluated five hips in five patients who had complete destruction of the femoral head and neck from septic arthritis when they were 3 months old. All patients were treated with a trochanteric arthroplasty in combination with a proximal femoral varus osteotomy at a mean age of 30 months in an attempt to salvage a femoral-pelvic articulation. Results suggest this treatment can provide a stable, painless, and functional hip, with an improved gait and less leg-length discrepancy than predicted if no reconstructive effort were attempted.



Polls results
1

On a scale of 1 to 10, rate how much this article will change your clinical practice?

NO change
BIG change
81% Article relates to my practice (9/11)
18% Article does not relate to my practice (2/11)
0% Undecided (0/11)
2

Will this article lead to more cost-effective healthcare?

54% Yes (6/11)
27% No (3/11)
18% Undecided (2/11)
3

Was this article biased? (commercial or personal)

0% Yes (0/11)
100% No (11/11)
0% Undecided (0/11)
4

What level of evidence do you think this article is?

8% Level 1 (1/12)
0% Level 2 (0/12)
58% Level 3 (7/12)
33% Level 4 (4/12)
0% Level 5 (0/12)