➤:
Femoral neck stress fractures (FNSFs) are an infrequent condition in athletic and military populations.

➤:
A high index of suspicion with liberal use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is vital for early recognition and treatment initiation.

➤:
An associated hip effusion on MRI is a risk factor for an evolving stress injury and requires close assessment and consideration for repeat MRI.

➤:
Stress reactions and stable, incomplete FNSFs (< 50% of femoral neck width) can be treated nonsurgically.

➤:
Surgical intervention is accepted for high-risk, incomplete (≥50% of femoral neck width), and complete FNSFs.

➤:
Overall, there is a paucity of high-quality literature on the rates of return to activity following FNSF.





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