Management of metastatic long bone fractures requires identification of the lesion and the use of sound fracture fixation principles to relieve pain and restore function. The treating surgeon must understand the principles of pathologic fracture fixation before initiating treatment. Because these fractures occur in the context of a progressive systemic disease, management typically involves a multidisciplinary approach. When considering surgical stabilization of these fractures, the abnormal (or absent) healing environment associated with diseased bone and the overall condition of the patient must be taken into account. The goal of surgery is to obtain a rigid mechanical construct, which allows for early mobility and weight bearing. This can be achieved using internal fixation with polymethyl methacrylate cement or segmental resection and joint reconstruction. Prosthetic joint arthroplasty is a more reliable means of fracture management when insufficient bone is present for fixation. Prophylactic stabilization of impending pathologic fractures can reduce the morbidity associated with metastatic lesions.



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