Total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) has become the treatment of choice for most glenohumeral arthritides. Results are variable and depend on many factors, including normal and prosthetic anatomy and biomechanics, surgical technique, rotator-cuff integrity, bone deficiency, and postoperative rehabilitation. In this article, we discuss these factors and their influence on achieving successful TSAs.





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